FEATURED POSTS

The Phantom of the Opera: Historical Inspirations, Literary Analysis, & Film Adaptations -- a Spooky Spotlight on the Gothic Novel

9 Jun 2019

1/10
Please reload

The

CLASSIC HORROR BLOG

Illuminating Supernatural Fiction, Horror, and the Gothic

from Mary Shelley to H. P. Lovecraft

  • Twitter - White Circle
  • Facebook - White Circle
  • Instagram - White Circle

Since its publication in 1898, Henry James' "The Turn of the Screw" has absorbed our collective imaginations. It is a story that pits innocence against corruption, desire against duty, and children against ghosts. While it has been filmed over a dozen times for both th...

“Moonlight, in a familiar room, falling so white upon the carpet, and showcasing all its figures so distinctly, -- making every object so minute visible, yet so unlike a morning or noontide visibility, -- is a medium the most suitable for a romance-writer to get acquai...

Like the other exemplars of the five respective genres of literary horror (Frankenstein, Dracula, Jekyll and Hyde, Haunting of Hill House), “The Turn of the Screw” has a fascinating genesis. Mary Shelley and Robert Louis Stevenson were both inspired by horrifying night...

The last of James’ ghost stories, written six years before his death, is widely considered his best, after “Turn of the Screw.” “The Jolly Corner” is rife with personal details: it was penned thirty-three years after James’ settlement in Europe, and three years after h...

One of James’ darkest tales – exceeding “Romance of Certain Old Clothes” and rivalling Turn – “Owen Wingrave” has been his second-most commented upon ghost story, surpassing even “The Jolly Corner,” and shares the distinction with Turn of the Screw of having been made...

Henry James’ ghost stories are famously for their vague, psychological qualities, their unreliable (or reliable?) narrators, and their chilling mixture of realism and romantic suggestiveness. There is the sense that his ghosts are often not real – not genuine phantoms...

He was not one for terror, or even horror. His fiction is impressionistic, psychological, and "courtly," but it has one pervasive emotion to it: unease -- discomfort, awkwardness, and a lurking shame buried in intentional secrecy. The fear of truth. The terror of expos...

The very first literary ghost story that I ever read was “The Turn of the Screw.” I had loads of books about hauntings, phantom hitchhikers, cryptozoology, and supernatural folklore, but Henry James was the first writer who engaged my intellect as well as my imaginatio...

Please reload

RECENT POSTS
Please reload

JOIN US
  • Facebook Classic