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The

CLASSIC HORROR BLOG

 

Literary Essays on Horror, Ghost Stories & Weird Fiction

— from Mary Shelley to M. R. James —

by M. Grant Kellermeyer

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20 Romantic Ghost Stories of Desire, Jealousy, Love, & Loss to Read this Valentine's Day

Romance has always had a dark side: something sinister, possessive, even fatal lurks behind the desire to attract and be attracted. For centuries something spiritual – even supernatural – has been suspected in the ways of lovers in the night. Shakespeare called love-making “the beast with two backs”; in many ages the monomaniacal lust of a man for one woman has been blamed on witchcraft; the French refer to the sleep that follows intercourse as “le petite mort” – the little death. There is a night-side to our amours: a dark, animalistic release that takes place when we are alone with our love, drenched with shadows and candlelight.



Something vestigial and primitive about romance returns us to our less civilized forms, and for some of us, it is one of the few moments that we can genuinely sense our relationship to infinity and the realm of spirits. Consequently, romance has become one of the most prominent themes in Gothic fiction: from “Dracula” to “The Phantom of the Opera,” from “Wuthering Heights” to “The Raven,” nothing bridges the gap between reality and imagination, the physical and the spiritual, quite so nimbly as carnal attraction; and no genre is more capable of deconstructing these emotions quite so nimbly as horror.

As a result, for some people there is nothing quite so romantic as a darkened castle or a windy moor: the idea of guttering candles, the flash of a white negligee slipping down a dark hallway, the distant peal of subterranean organ music. If this is how you'd like to spend your Valentine's Day, then eschew the chocolates and roses and sit down with these classic stories of desire, jealousy, love, and loss from the masters of classic horror.

20. THE WOMAN’S GHOST STORY

ALGERNON BLACKWOOD

One of the most sensual ghost stories ever written, this tale features a spirited, female ghost hunter who stuns an audience of men with her account of being trapped in a room with a tormented male ghost. Although her experience is initially terrifying, it eventually becomes transcendental and spiritually purifying, as she frees them both from fear.


(READ IT HERE)

19. OLALLA

– ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

A classic vampire story, “Olalla” is set in the dusty plains of 19th century Spain, where a wounded soldier falls in love with an aristocratic girl in spite of her demented, inbred family. They make plans to flee her Gothic manor together, but when he accidentally cuts his hand in front of her mother, a dormant family curse comes to life.


(READ IT HERE)

18. THE WAY IT CAME

– HENRY JAMES


Doesn’t everyone know two friends who would be a great couple if they ever met? In this Henry James story, the planned setup by the mutual friends of a man and woman are delayed over several years (both are interested, but the timing is never right), but when the young woman dies unexpectedly, her spirit decides to heed their meddling friends, and she appears to the still-living man, leading to the strangest, shortest blind date.


(READ IT HERE)

17. THE SPECTRE BRIDEGROOM

– WASHINGTON IRVING


Like “The Way it Came,” “The Spectre Bridegroom” is a study in matchmaking gone wrong. A German noblewoman is awaiting the arrival of her bridegroom on the night before their arranged marriage, but when he bursts in the castle, his face is pale and serious, and they latter learn of his murder in the woods. She is stunned by the loss, and when her servants catch her talking in the garden with the spirit, they are terrified that she has fallen in love with a dangerous ghost.


(READ IT HERE)

16. THE ADVENTURE OF THE GERMAN STUDENT

– WASHINGTON IRVING


Falling in love with dead people is especially dangerous in Washington Irving’s universe: in this classic campfire story (it has since become a classic urban legend) set during the French Revolution, a radical intellectual is smitten with a mournful woman he meets at the foot of the guillotine during a thunderstorm. Learning that her entire family was executed, he takes her home as his lover, eagerly beds her, and in the morning learns the dreadful secret of the black velvet choker she refuses to remove


(READ IT HERE)

15. JOHN CHARRINGTON’S WEDDING

– EDITH NESBIT


Another classic story, this tale of love’s power beyond the grave is not charming or sweet, but terrifying. John Charrington was obsessed with May Foster and vowed to marry her. When she finally agrees after years of teasing, she is shocked when he shows up late to their wedding (covered in dust and uncharacteristically gloomy). When they finally drive off together, she will learn just how deeply John Charrington desired to possess her -- body and soul.


(READ IT HERE)

14. THE DANCE OF DEATH

– ALGERNON BLACKWOOD


Despite his doctor’s warnings that he should avoid strenuous activity, the protagonist of this mystical story would not say no to the local dance: his job is thankless, his life is dull, but dances are his passion. There he becomes entranced with a strange woman named Ivy, dressed in a beautiful dress of living green. Although he never learns her identity, we have a good idea by the time their dance is done.


(READ IT HERE)

13. THE BRIDAL PAIR

– ROBERT W. CHAMBERS


A man returns to the town where he first met the lover he abandoned. Weary with guilt and eager to reconcile, he walks the streets thinking about her. When he climbs the hills and finds the pine trees where they had first pledged their love, he is surprised to find her waiting for him there, and they reminisce about the sunny days of their romance long into the night. In the morning the villagers discover the ending of their love story.


(READ IT HERE)

12. MAN OVERBAORD!

– F. MARION CRAWFORD


Jealousy is powerful and can drive the best of us to desperate, foolish acts. In this seafaring tale, two brothers fall in love with the same pretty girl, and stew over their attachments as they sail on the same merchant ship. When one is mysteriously lost overboard, the other returns to shore in search of his beloved. He wins and woos her, but feels, all the time, as though they are not ever really, truly alone.


(READ IT HERE)

11. CAPTAIN OF "THE POLESTAR"

– SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE